Adulting: People are people, unfortunately

People might not be wishing the worst for you, but they certainly aren’t wishing you the best either. There’s something about bettering yourself that makes people uncomfortable and angry. People have no problem assuming what I’m incapable of without giving thought to all the things I’ve already accomplished. Or if they have, it’s dismissed with little regard.

I’ve wondered why it is that people want to think of me as lesser than, less intelligent, less of everything than they are. I’ve concluded it’s a combination of insecurity, social conditioning, and a lack of desire on their part. You can say what you want about progress. In my eyes it comes in many shapes and fails to become anything more than a concept, like most things.

Sometimes I wish people would just come out and say, “I’m supposed to be better than you. I’m not Black.” This goes unsaid, but it’s clear in the way people behave and how they speak. It’s evident in the opportunities that aren’t given, in the invitations that aren’t sent, the lack of consideration to the way you feel…I could go on.

I’m not writing with an emphasis on eloquence or a desire to be politically correct. I’m writing with the intent of transparency and making my thoughts clear for anyone reading. In the past year I’ve come up against some of the worst kinds of people. Racists, misogynists, people who can’t shake their own misery who desire to suck everyone into it like an inescapable void.┬áThat’s a pathetic kind of life, isn’t it.

It’s takes more courage to be generous and happy than it does to be hateful and injurious. While I have the propensity for forgiveness, I believe forgiveness isn’t warranted on all occasions, nor is it applicable. I don’t need apologies. I need for people to stop being trash.

Throw Fuel to the Fire: The Goal of Authors

tumblr_llkq26QmEs1qk8xguo1_500

Pop culture gleams with reality television like, Teen Mom, and best-selling shock value buys, like Fifty Shades of Grey. The Shakespearean downfalls due to drug addiction, family betrayals, and greed are enough to make our mouths water. We all know drama and exploitation sells big time and it’s easy to think back on childhood in all its perceived wholesomeness, but of course, the 90s and early 2000s came with their fair share of rubbish too. Jerry Springer, anyone? In a world where monetary value is the only thing of value, does socially conscious literature stand a chance?

Continue reading